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Showing posts from 2016

Tech Trends That Will Shape The Future Of Fashion And Luxury Retail In 2017

Blockchain in use by Babyghost at Shanghai Fashion Week (Image: Babyghost) The fashion industry – from your department store to your luxury boutique – is undergoing significant change at the hands of the digital revolution. That’s not new in concept. Neither, mind you, is talking about things like artificial intelligence, virtual reality or blockchain as emerging technologies. Put those two together however, and things start getting interesting. Broad business adoption of machine learning (for instance) is one thing, but in the context of the impact that then has on shopping, we start to be able to see what the future might look like. At this time of year, the web is inundated with predictions for what lies ahead, especially in the marketing and technology space. Yet, at a point when consumers are not only more demanding than ever, but market conditions are increasingly volatile, keeping abreast of such movements has also never been so pertinent. Read Article:  http://www.forbes.com/s…

Top Tech Milestones in Recent Fashion History

1998
I, RobotFashion as performance art is exemplified to the max at Alexander McQueen’s Spring 1999 show, where the designer employs robots to spray-paint a dress worn by model Shalom Harlow in shades of black and yellow as she spins on a revolving platform. "If there’s one thing we can all agree on, it’s that the future of fashion looks smart, sleek, and chicer than ever as the worlds of technology and haute couture collide. Look no further than the Costume Institute’s exhibition “Manus x Machina: Fashion in an Age of Technology,” which opened its doors yesterday at the Met, for proof. And while newfound synergies between the smart and the stylish continue to be the stuff of headlines, we’re taking a step back in time to consider some of the top tech moments in recent fashion history." Read Entire Article:  http://www.vogue.com/slideshow/13434232/manus-x-machina-fashion-technology-timeline/

Wrist Watches: From Battlefield to Fashion Accessory

LONDON — The evolution of the gentleman’s pocket watch into the ubiquitous wristwatch had its roots in the wars of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. World War I was the seminal moment when the wristwatch became both a strategic military tool and a manly fashion accessory. With the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I approaching in July, several watchmakers are commemorating the simple designs that allowed military leaders to coordinate precision attacks and to usher in a new era of battle by airplane. Historians say that the idea of strapping little clocks to soldier’s wrists probably was conceived during the Boer War or perhaps in the German navy shortly before — there are some historical accounts of Napoleon’s being frustrated by having to constantly open his pocket watch during battle — but most agree that World War I secured the wristwatch’s place, both in military history and at the pinnacle of men’s jewelry. Wristwatches were worn only by women before the 20th c…

Fashion’s Favorite Pets

eptember sees not only the start of the women’s wear fashion season, but also the beginning of the fashion book season. As fall unfurls, glossy and gorgeous coffee table books appear: Grace Coddington’s “Grace: The American Vogue Years”; Alix Browne’s “Runway: The Spectacle of Fashion”; and Donatella Versace’s “Versace,” to name a few. Yet among them, one stands out: “Neville Jacobs: I’m Marc’s Dog,” a compilation of photographs taken by Nicolas Newbold of Marc Jacobs’s dog, a.k.a. Neville Jacobs. Neville, the latest furry fashion friend to hit the big time, joins Karl Lagerfeld’s cat Choupette and Thom Browne’s miniature dachshund Hector as a star on the rise. They have their own social media followings, eating habits and daily routines. Think of them as the supermodels of the pet set. Here’s how they compare. Photo Neville Jacobs, bull terrierAge: 4 years old Owner: Marc Jacobs Instagram:@nevillejacobs, which has more than 194,000 followers Big break: A little over three years ago, the…

Kensington Palace Releases Details Of Diana Exhibition

KENSINGTON PALACE has released more details about what we can expect from its special exhibition celebrating the style of Princess Diana next year, Diana: Her Fashion Story.


"The exhibition will bring together an extraordinary collection of garments, ranging from the glamorous evening gowns worn on engagements in the Eighties, to the chic Catherine Walker suits that made up Diana’s working wardrobe in the Nineties," read a press release this morning. "The Princess’s relationship with her favourite designers will also be explored through a display of some of their original fashion sketches, created for her during the design process." Highlights from the show are said to include the pink Emanuel blouse Diana wore for her engagement portrait by Lord Snowdon in 1981 and the Victor Edelstein velvet gown which she wore at the White House when she famously danced with John Travolta. The royal residence, which was the Princess's London home for 15 years, will also see …

The fascinating history of the ever popular tennis shoe.

Tennis shoes, also called athletic shoes or sneakers (which so are called so because wearers of these shoes are able to sneak silently), of course aren’t just for tennis. They are used for just about every aspect of life from fashion statement to every major sport. Tennis shoes trace its origins back to the industrial revolution in the 19th century. Because of the discovery of canvas and vulcanized rubber, as well as the advent of mass production, these shoes were now more commercially available and thus, cheaper compared to individually hand-made footwear. Plimsolls (or plimsoles) are said to be the precursors of the tennis shoes. Like tennis shoes, plimsolls are made of canvas on the upper part with a rubber sole and are lightweight compared to other chunky and heavy footwear. It was at the Liverpool Rubber Company in England where plimsolls were first created and developed, and were once used as a beach footwear. By the late 19th century, more rubber companies were engaged in the pr…

An interesting article predicting how technology will impact fashion.

Fashion Industry has transitioned to becoming digital-centric. Most retailers finally sailed through the first stage in ecommerce retailing by setting up visually appealing online versions of stores, integrating payment gateways and offering efficient delivery logistics. Over the next two years, there are several areas where technology will help ease online discovery and conversions. Technology will make it easy for consumers to go from inspiration to purchase. Customers see a lovely handbag at a party and technology will help them find it. They might like an item but can’t afford it. There will be tools that can help them find something similar and economical Technology will provide answers for questions like:  Can I get real-time guidance on creating outfits from individual items? Can we solve the eternal question of “What should I wear today”?Can I get real-time opinions from their friends whether something suits me?Can a fashion guru help style me every day? Work at the intersecti…

The fascinating history of the umbrella and parasol.

History of umbrellas is long and eventful. From the earliest appearances of simple palm leaf umbrella, long age of being synonym to wealth, to the modern time when is regarded as general item, umbrellas managed to intersect with our history in many interesting ways. Advancements in technology, changing tastes, and use in religion all enabled umbrellas to grow and prosper, becoming one of the principal ways we protect ourselves from rain. Protection from sun with umbrellas and parasols slowly faded out from fashion, which can be contributed to the rise in popularity of hats. Parasols first appeared in ancient Egypt over 3 thousand years ago. Created to protect nobility and royalty from sunlight and enable their lifestyle that demanded pale skin, Egyptians never found a reason to waterproof their parasols and create umbrellas. This invention was instead discovered in 11th century BC China, where first leather umbrellas started being sold at a very high price and used only by nobility a…

FUNKY SUNGLASSES—The accessory that’s always been practical and fashionable

By Brunson Stafford WBS Public Relations Founder
The earliest historical reference to sunglasses dates back to ancient China and Rome. The Roman Emperor Nero watched gladiator fights through polished gems.  In China, sunglasses were used in the twelfth century, or possibly earlier. These sunglasses were made using lenses that were flat panes of smoky quartz. They offered no corrective powers nor did they protect from harmful UV rays, but they did protect the eyes from glare.
In prehistoric and historic time, various Eskimo tribes wore flattened walrus ivory “glasses,” which meant looking through narrow slits to block harmful reflected rays of the sun.
Modern civilization began experimenting with tinted lenses in spectacles around 1752. It was believed that blue or green-tinted glass could potentially correct specific vision impairments. Protection from the sun’s rays was not a concern at this time.  Glasses tinted with yellow-amber and brown were also commonly prescribed for people with …

THE MIRACULOUS MANUKA HONEY

By Brunson Stafford WBS Public Relations Founder Manuka honey is made by bees that feed on the flowers of the manuka bush, also known as the “Tea Tree,” in New Zealand. In Australia, the tree used to make manuka honey is called the “Jellybush.” The finest-quality manuka honey, with the most potent antimicrobial properties, is produced from hives in wild, uncultivated areas. The honey is distinctively flavored, darker, and richer than other honey. The curative properties of honey have been known to indigenous cultures for thousands of years, and dressing wounds with honey was common before the advent of antibiotics. Today, manuka honey is used in many industries, including the fashion industry. New Zealand's Maori were the first people to identify the healing properties of manuka, and some of their remedies and tonics are still used today. In recent tests conducted at Sydney University's School of Molecular and Microbial Biosciences, manuka honey killed every type of bacteria, i…